generate vol create commands for migrating volumes to new aggr

Anyone who has done a lot of migrations has some snippets jotted down to help streamline the process. On a filer with many volumes you can use this to generate the create commands for destination volumes on a new aggregate.

# for i in `ssh filer01 "vol status" | awk '/raid_dp/ {print $1}' | grep -v Volume | grep -v Warning | grep -v _new`; do j=`ssh filer01 "vol size $i" | grep 'has size' | sed -e "s/'//g" -e "s/\.//g"`; k=`echo $j | awk '{print "vol create "$5"_new newaggr "$NF}'`; echo $k ; done;
vol create vol12_new newaggr 10g
vol create vol13_new newaggr 70g
vol create vol14_new newaggr 1600g
<snip...>

If you trust your hackery enough, you might even send the commands over to actually create the vols…

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monitor NetApp SnapMirror transfer speed

You may want to monitor the speed of a current snapmirror to get an idea of how fast the transfer is going. The speed might change throughout the day due to load, or disk bottleneck, etc. I started with this one-liner:

i=0;j=0; while true; do j=$i; i=`ssh toaster01 "snapmirror status -l volname" | grep Progress | awk '{print $2}'| cut -d \( -f2`; if [ $j -eq 0 ]; then sleep 1m; continue; fi; echo -n "$i-$j = ";echo "scale=2;($i-$j)/(1024*1024)" | bc | tr '\n' ' '; echo "GB/min"; sleep 1m; done;

Which lead to this short script:

#!/bin/bash
# FILE: netapp_sm_monitor.sh
# AUTHOR: For Do Done <fordodone@fordodone.com>
# DATE: 2014/03/26
# NOTES: 
# 

if [ $# -lt 2 ]
then
  echo ""
  echo "usage: netapp_sm_monitor.sh <filer> <srcvol> [-v]"
  echo ""
  exit
fi

i=0;
j=0; 

while true; 
do 
  j=$i; 
  i=`ssh $1 "snapmirror status -l $2" | grep Progress | awk '{print $2}'| cut -d \( -f2`; 
  if [ $j -eq 0 ]; 
    then 
    sleep 1m; 
    continue; 
  fi; 
  if [ "$3" == "-v" ]
  then
    echo -n "$i-$j = ";
  fi
  echo "scale=2;($i-$j)/(1024*1024)" | bc | tr '\n' ' '; echo "GB/min"; 
  sleep 1m; 
done;
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increase number of inodes in netapp volume

Your NetApp volume is at 85% and all is well right? What about inode usage? Don’t forget to monitor that and increase it as needed. Don’t set it too high, because inodes take up space, and you can’t shrink the number of inodes. If you do run out of inodes, you will get an autosupport, but until you provision more inodes no writes can happen on the volume. Use the maxfiles command to see how many you have as well as to increase the number.

toaster> maxfiles vol1
Volume vol1: maximum number of files is currently 35999995 (35056570 used).
toaster> maxfiles vol1 37000000
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NetApp show disk firmware progress

During disk firmware upgrades, you may wonder how long it’s taking or how it’s moving along. Use this one liner to count how many disks have the old and new firmware versions:

# ssh toaster "sysconfig -a" | grep NA0 | awk '{ if (/NA06/)i++; if (/NA01/)j++; } END{ print "NA01: "j" NA06: "i}'
NA01: 133 NA06: 91

So it’s moving along.

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NetApp decode acp domain option

How does this option function to set a network? The acp.domain option is a convoluted decimal representation of the network portion of the IP address used for acp.

toaster*> options acp
acp.domain 65193
acp.enabled on
acp.netmask 65535
acp.port e0f

Take 65193 and convert it to binary: 1111111010101001. Then split it up into two (or more) octets: 11111110 10101001. Then convert each of the octets back to decimal: 254 169. Then reverse the order: 169 254. That is the acp network. The netmask portion is more straightforward. In this case our ACP network is 169.254/16.

You could hack a quick little one liner:

# for i in `echo "obase=2;65193" |bc | awk 'BEGIN{FS=""} {for(i=1;i<33;i++){printf $i; if(i==8)printf " ";}printf "\n"}'`; do echo "ibase=2;$i" |bc; done|tac | paste - - | sed 's/\t/./'
169.254
#
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NetApp remove disk ownership without reboot

To remove disk ownership without going into maintenance mode, you can use these commands. Pro Tip: Don’t remove ownership from disks in an online aggregate, such as the one with your root volume in it.

toaster> priv set diag
Warning: These diagnostic commands are for use by NetApp
         personnel only.
toaster*> disk assign 0a.16 -s unowned -f
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awk average multiple columns

If you have some output lined up in columns, use awk to average the columns. Here’s some sample output (from a NetApp “toaster> stats show -p flexscale-access”)

    
# cat sample.txt
    73   5480      0   1040  84     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       541
    73   6038     39   1119  84     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       475
    73   5018     19    859  85     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       348
    73   5960     20   1480  80   120     0    320     0      0     0      0       427
    73   6098      0   1019  85     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       486
    73   5220      0   1220  81     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       288
    73   5758     79   1319  81    59    39    319     0      0     0      0       500
    73   4419      0   2039  68     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       279
    73   5400      0    840  86     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       382
    73   5238      0   1299  80     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       389
    73   5449      0   1696  76    59     0    199     0      0     0      0       340
    73   5478      0   1419  79     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       414
    73   5020     20   1000  83     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       405
    73   4359      0   1059  80     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       295
    73   5838     39   1139  83     0    19      0     0      0     0      0       494
    73   6100     40   1720  78     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       480
    73   5398     19   1239  81     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       398
    73   5089     79   1097  82     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       459
    73   6178     19   1159  84     0    39    159     0      0     0      0       487
    73   4999      0   1239  80     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       345
    73   4820      0    880  84     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       339
    73   5467      0   1177  82     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       413
    73   4700     60   1480  76     0     0      0     0      0     0      0       337
#

And the column averages:

# cat sample.txt | awk '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++){a[i]+=$i;}} END {for (i=1;i<=NF;i++){printf "%.0f", a[i]/NR; printf "\t"};printf "\n"}'
73      5371    19      1241    81      10      4       43      0       0       0       0       405
#

Here awk loops through each field in a row, and adds the value to an array (a[i]) with the key being the field number. Then at the end, it takes the total, and divides by the number of rows (NR) and prints that (without decimals). It separates each field by a tab (\t) and after the end record prints a newline (\n).

You could make it print totals, as well as averages. You could also make it print out the original data, or a field header to know what each column represents...

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