NetApp decode acp domain option

How does this option function to set a network? The acp.domain option is a convoluted decimal representation of the network portion of the IP address used for acp.

toaster*> options acp
acp.domain 65193
acp.enabled on
acp.netmask 65535
acp.port e0f

Take 65193 and convert it to binary: 1111111010101001. Then split it up into two (or more) octets: 11111110 10101001. Then convert each of the octets back to decimal: 254 169. Then reverse the order: 169 254. That is the acp network. The netmask portion is more straightforward. In this case our ACP network is 169.254/16.

You could hack a quick little one liner:

# for i in `echo "obase=2;65193" |bc | awk 'BEGIN{FS=""} {for(i=1;i<33;i++){printf $i; if(i==8)printf " ";}printf "\n"}'`; do echo "ibase=2;$i" |bc; done|tac | paste - - | sed 's/\t/./'
169.254
#
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diff command outputs, not files

You can easily diff the output of commands instead of files. In this case hexdump prints thousands of lines, but I’m only interested in the difference:

# diff <(hexdump file1.bin) <(hexdump file2.bin)
1,2c1,2
< 0000000 6a49 b610 0000 0000 5733 7261 4465 4243
< 0000010 0000 0000 0001 0000 9006 4e0b 0b28 000f
---
> 0000000 6a49 b616 0000 0000 5733 7261 4465 4243
> 0000010 0000 0000 0001 0000 9006 4e11 0b28 000f

Run the hexdump in subshell using parenthesis, then redirect the output back to diff. I’m only interested in the 2 pieces that are different for each binary file:

# for i in `ls *.bin | sort -nk1.7`; do echo -n "$i: "; hexdump -C $i | grep '33 57 61 72 65 44\|4e 28 0b 0f 00' | awk '{if(NR==1) print $4;if(NR==2) print $12}' | paste - -; done | column -t 2>/dev/null
file0.bin:   1a  15
file1.bin:   19  14
file2.bin:   18  13
file3.bin:   17  12
file4.bin:   16  11
file5.bin:   15  10
file6.bin:   14  0f
file8.bin:   12  0d
file9.bin:   11  0c
file10.bin:  10  0b
file12.bin:  0e  09
file13.bin:  0d  08
file14.bin:  0f  0a
file15.bin:  0b  06
file16.bin:  0a  05
file17.bin:  09  04
file18.bin:  08  03
file19.bin:  07  02
file20.bin:  06  01
file21.bin:  05  00
file22.bin:  0c  07
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dhcpd lease information sorted by date and time

When looking on a pxe boot install server, you can see what the newest clients were to boot. If you don’t have KVM access on new servers to be installed, just look at the newest lease info, and make an educated guess about which new one to login to the auto-installer environment (preseed) via ssh.

Here’s a snippet from the leases file:

lease 10.101.40.85 {
  starts 3 2013/05/15 19:54:36;
  ends 3 2013/05/15 20:54:36;
  cltt 3 2013/05/15 19:54:36;
  binding state active;
  next binding state free;
  hardware ethernet 00:30:48:5c:cf:34;
  uid "\001\0000H\\\3174";
}

And after some parsing:

# cat /var/lib/dhcp/dhcpd.leases | grep -e lease -e hardware -e start -e end | grep -v format | grep -v written | sed -e '/start/s/\// /g' -e 's/;//g' -e '/starts/s/:/ /g' | paste - - - - | awk '{print $2" "$18" "$6" "$7" "$8" "$9" "$10" "$11" "$14" "$15}' | sort -k 3,3n -k 4,4n -k 5,5n -k 6,6n -k 7,7n -k 8,8n | awk '{print $1" "$2" "$3"/"$4"/"$5" "$6":"$7":"$8" "$9" "$10}' | column -t


10.101.40.127  00:1e:68:9a:e5:ac  2013/04/26  22:02:58  2013/04/26  23:02:58
10.101.40.129  00:1e:68:9a:e5:ac  2013/04/26  23:10:01  2013/04/27  00:10:01
10.101.40.122  00:1e:68:9a:e5:ac  2013/04/26  23:27:57  2013/04/26  23:30:42
10.101.40.118  00:1e:68:9a:ee:69  2013/05/14  16:21:28  2013/05/14  17:21:28
10.101.40.85   00:30:48:5c:cf:34  2013/05/14  16:54:43  2013/05/14  17:54:43
10.101.40.118  00:1e:68:9a:ee:69  2013/05/14  17:14:04  2013/05/14  18:14:04
10.101.40.85   00:30:48:5c:cf:34  2013/05/14  17:24:43  2013/05/14  18:24:43
10.101.40.85   00:30:48:5c:cf:34  2013/05/14  17:54:42  2013/05/14  18:54:42
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